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Wednesday, 16 May 2018


“I used to think truth was eternal, that once I knew, once I saw, it would be with me forever, a constant by which everything else could be measured. I know now that this isn't so, that most truths are inherently unretainable, that we have to work hard all our lives to remember the most basic things. Society is no help. It tells us again and again that we can most be ourselves by acting and looking like someone else...”

― Lucy Grealy, Autobiography of a Face
“We are a link in a chain in making a contribution that goes well beyond our own life. And that’s part of what makes dying tolerable. That’s what makes being a mortal creature tolerable.”
 --  Atul Gawande

 Listen to Atul over at On Being : What Matters in the End and then revisit this one, How Trauma and Resilience Cross Generations

Tuesday, 15 May 2018

Karin Mamma Andersson: Paintings as Weapons from Louisiana Channel on Vimeo.


“Being an artist,” says Mamma Andersson, ”is to go around in circles in different directions. You always go back to start like in a game of Monopoly.” It is a professional development that is akin to personal growth, a constant coming back to core issues to understand yourself.” For Mamma Andersson, this means always returning to painting and images: “It's through painting that I reach a psychological or political level.”

Karin Mamma Andersson






Sunday, 13 May 2018

Blogging, that much-maligned pastime, is gradually but surely disappearing from the Internet, and so, consequently, is a lot of online freedom and fun ... Blogs are necessarily idiosyncratic, entirely about sensibility: they can only be run by workhorses who are creative enough to amuse themselves and distinct enough to hook an audience ... who work more on the principle of personal obsession than pay.

Jia Tolentino, "The End of The Awl and the Vanishing of Freedom and Fun From the Internet." The New Yorker, 1/18/2018.

 life got on the way of posting for awhile, but i'm happy to be 'sketchbooking' again....

Monday, 6 November 2017

For Equilibrium, a Blessing

Like the joy of the sea coming home to shore,
May the relief of laughter rinse through your soul.

As the wind loves to call things to dance,
May your gravity by lightened by grace.

Like the dignity of moonlight restoring the earth,
May your thoughts incline with reverence and respect.

As water takes whatever shape it is in,
So free may you be about who you become.

As silence smiles on the other side of what's said,
May your sense of irony bring perspective.

As time remains free of all that it frames,
May your mind stay clear of all it names.

May your prayer of listening deepen enough
to hear in the depths the laughter of god.


― John O'Donohue, To Bless the Space Between Us: A Book of Blessings

charlotte rudolph





Tuesday, 31 October 2017

note to self


Our ignorance is their power so take every opportunity to make the connection with those around you, listen and learn.
Connections create community.
Community helps understanding.
Understanding fuels empathy.
Empathy facilitates change.

John McCracken





family

The Family, the cosmic, transcends our realms of humanity.
Your mother
         father
         sister
         brother
         stranger
         lover
         friend
         and enemy
The birds
The bees
The flowers
The trees
All interstellar entities
Everything that lives and breathes
We are all family.

--Zoe Bedeaux from i-D Soul

Gillian Wearing

we are all one here


John Ashbery, from 'How to Continue.'

You Are Me

Friday, 20 October 2017



Barcelona-based director Gerard Montero talks about Empty, a film he made with choreographer Paloma Muñoz:

"The film explores ideas around dance and the significance we place on movement, which can't always be easily explained. In this empty space of the swimming pool we explored the poetic potential of the body’s movement and how a place can effect how we shape it.

turtles all the way down

“My goal is simple. It is complete understanding of the universe, why it is as it is and why it exists at all.”
—Stephen Hawking, 1981
Stephen Hawking opens his new book with a marvelous old anecdote. A famous astronomer, after a lecture, was told by an elderly lady, who was perhaps under the influence of Hinduism, that his cosmology was all wrong. The world, she said, rests on the back of a giant tortoise. When the astronomer asked what the tortoise stands on, she replied: “You’re very clever, young man, very clever. But it’s turtles all the way down.”

Most people, Hawking writes, would find this cosmology ridiculous, but if we take the turtles as symbols of more and more fundamental laws, the tower is not so absurd. There are two ways to view it. Either a single turtle is at the bottom, standing on nothing, or it’s turtles all the way down. Both views are held by leading physicists. David Bohm and Freeman Dyson, to mention two, favor the infinite regress—wheels within wheels, boxes inside boxes, but never a final box.1 Hawking is on the other side. He believes that physics is finally closing in on the ultimate turtle.

--  Review of A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes by Stephen W. Hawking

Riccardo Guarneri






Wednesday, 13 September 2017

Tuesday, 12 September 2017

“An Eskimo [Inuit] custom offers an angry person release by walking the emotion out of his or her system in a straight line across the landscape; the point at which the anger is conquered is marked with a stick, bearing witness to the strength or length of the rage.”

― Lucy R. Lippard, Overlay: Contemporary Art and the Art of Prehistory

a record collective disobedience.


"Desire lines, also known as cow paths, pirate paths, social trails, kemonomichi (beast trails), chemins de l’âne (donkey paths), and Olifantenpad (elephant trails), can be found all over the city and all over the world, scarring pristine lawns and worming through forest undergrowth. They appear anywhere people want to walk, where no formal paths have been provided. (Sometimes they even appear despite the existence of formal paths, out of what seems to be sheer mulishness—or, perhaps, cowishness.) Some view them as evidence of pedestrians’ inability or unwillingness to do what they’re told; in the words of one academic journal, they “record collective disobedience.”
Robert Moor, 'Tracing (and Erasing) New York's Lines of Desire.' The New Yorker, 2/20/2017.


Image by Richard Long: A Line Made by Walking, 1967.
Between hitchhiking lifts, [Long] stopped in a field in Wiltshire where he walked backwards and forwards until the flattened turf caught the sunlight and became visible as a line. He photographed this work ...
(I have a copy of this on my wall...thank you natalie!)

where i am for now


What do I believe in? Imagination, gardens, science, poetry, love, and a variety of nonviolent consolations. I suspect that in the aggregate all this isn't enough, but it's where I am for now.
Teju Cole, from 'A Conversation with Aleksandar Hemon' in Known and Strange Things. (found via evencleveland)